THE WARRIOR 

 ACCORDING TO THE LUPUS FOUNDATION OF AMERICA,

AT LEAST 1.5 MILLION AMERICANS

HAVE  LUPUS 

THE MAN

"If life throws you a curveball...you can learn to hit a curveball. If life gave you a train, all you can do is pray it is not the end." Jordan D. Savage

This was Jordan's famous quote to friends after spending 174 days in hospital care in 2013.

 

Jordan loved sports and played everything he could. He was also a walking sports encyclopedia and could converse on any topic. Most people were fascinated by his knowledge of NASCAR.

 

Originally diagnosed with Discoid Lupus around age 10, Jordan developed SLE or systemic lupus erythematosus at age 17. It put an end to his desire to become a military officer and stifled his ability to play sports.

Undaunted by this new challenge, he found a way to become involved in sports. He could be a manager.

 

He was approached by the soccer coach at his school who asked him to help out as statistician for the team. Wheelchair-bound, he traveled with the team and as he progressed to a walker and crutches, enjoyed being involved with sports again.

 

His long-term dream was to one day own the Tampa Bay Rays and move them to Charlotte.

 

His short term goal was to walk across the stage at graduation; he accomplished his goal. He was originally scheduled to graduate in 2013 but was in the hospital most of the year. While recovering, he took online classes. Then, when he was finally discharged, he decided that he wanted to get out of the house and go to classes with his friends.

 

He would get the wheelchair bus, or his mom would take him to school. Even when he didn't feel well, He said, "Once I got to school, I felt better."

 

THE HARD TRUTH

 

 

 

63%...REPORT BEING INCORRECTLY DIAGNOSED

55%

REPORT SEEING FOUR OR MORE DIFFERENT HEALTHCARE PROVIDERS

7%

DON'T TELL ANYONE ABOUT IT

Lupus is three times more likely to strike minorities, including African-Americans, Hispanics and Asians. Lupus affects more than the combined 

 

Lupus is two to three times more prevalent among women of color -- African Americans, Hispanics/Latinos, Asians, Native Americans, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders -- than among Caucasian women.  

 

Research suggests 4 percent to 22 percent of those with lupus are male. Men develop the same typical clinical manifestations of lupus as women, yet certain key symptoms may be different. Kidney and skin involvement, for example, may be more common among men with lupus. Active lupus can cause many symptoms, which will make it much harder to cope. So it is important that lupus be controlled as well as it can be.

The survey participants cited pain (65%), lifestyle changes (61%), and emotional problems associated with lupus (50%) as the most difficult factors for coping with lupus.

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© 2019 by The Jordan D. Savage Foundation.

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